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January 9, 1984

Robert Coles is professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities at Harvard Medical School. He is an award-winning author and editor whose research and writings focus on, among other things, how children develop their political convictions and moral values.

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November 17, 1983

Elie Wiesel is the Andrew Mellon Professor of Humanities at Boston University and chairman of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council. A survivor of Auschwitz and Buchenwald concentration camps, he is a prolific author whose writings provide a vivid, first-hand perspective on the Holocaust. He is the author of the trilogy Night, Dawn, and Day, and his 1979 book and play, The Trial of God, is based on an experience at Auschwitz where three Jewish prisoners staged a trial against God for allowing the oppression of the Jewish people.

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October 27, 1983

Robert E. White joined the United States Foreign Service in 1955. He served in a variety of positions at the State Department and in U.S. delegations, primarily in Latin America. In 1968, he became the deputy regional director and then regional director for the Peace Corps in the Latin America region. From 1975 to 1977, he was Deputy U.S. Permanent Representative to the Organization of American States. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter nominated him as U.S. Ambassador to Paraguay and later to El Salvador. After retiring from the Foreign Service, he served as a Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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September 15, 1983

Georgie Anne Geyer served as a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Daily News and is currently a syndicated columnist for the Universal Press Syndicate. She has interviewed leading figures in global politics, including Fidel Castro, Saddam Hussein, Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini, Cambodia’s Prince Sihanouk, and Libya’s Moammar Gaddafi. She is a regular commentator on Washington Week in Review, Voice of America, and Meet the Press.

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April 21, 1983

Pavel Litvinov is a Soviet intellectual, scientist, and dissident leader who was forced out of the Soviet Union for his activism in support of human rights and political prisoners. In 1974, he moved to the U.S. where he joined fellow dissident Valery Chalidze in publishing A Chronicle of Human Rights in the USSR, documenting political repression in that country. He is the grandson of Maxim Litvinov, Stalin’s foreign minister during the 1930s and Ambassador to the United States.

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March 24, 1983

Harry Levinson is a lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and the president of The Levinson Institute. A noted author and consultant on emotional health in the business world, he is the creator of the Division of Industrial Mental Health at The Menninger Foundation.

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February 17, 1983

Eugenia Zukerman is a flutist, recording artist, novelist, and journalist. Since 1980, she has been the classical music commentator for CBS News Sunday Morning. An internationally renowned flute virtuoso, she appears regularly as a soloist with major orchestras and at major music festivals around the world.

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November 18, 1982

Helen Caldicott is the president of the national organization Physicians for Social Responsibility. She is a pediatrician at the Cystic Fibrosis Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital and a former faculty member at Harvard Medical School. One of the foremost leaders in the anti-nuclear movement, she is the author of Nuclear Madness: What You Can Do.

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October 28, 1982

Charles Kuralt is the anchorman for CBS News’ Sunday Morning and Morning with Charles Kuralt, and he hosts Dateline America on CBS Radio. He is a Peabody, Emmy, and Ernie Pyle Award-winning reporter and journalist, best known for his On the Road television series. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he worked as a reporter at the Charlotte News. Since he joined CBS in 1957, he has traveled the world as a journalist for the network.

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September 16, 1982

Dean Rusk is a professor of International Law at the University of Georgia. He served as U. S. Secretary of State from 1961-1969 under the presidencies of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. He joined the State Department in 1945 after his military service in World War II, working in the administration of Harry Truman. He is a former president of the Rockefeller Foundation and now serves as an advisor to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency at the State Department.